Tag Archive | dinosaurs.about.com

Mosasaur/Mosasaurus

Well we are still averaging a dinosaur or prehistoric animal a week. Dinosaur Train HERE has become an amazing resource for finding those interesting creatures we have yet to cover. I have to say, I love how vocabulary building the world of the prehistoric is… all of the kids are rather clear (minus Echo) on what carnivore is and quick to describe what features differentiate between close species.

The Mosasaur was an interesting one. Again we found it on our Dinosaur Train list. Their site has a great section dedicated to going through each of the dinosaurs covered on the show in some detail. Their field guide HERE. You will have to look through them to find our specific dinosaur of the day!

We had a few links of interest all about this aquatic carnivore. This lizard was a top ocean predator which were thought to have evolved from snake like lizards that left the land and returned to the ocean…

Here are those promised links!

  • Prehistoric-Wildlife.com HERE
  • Jurassic Park Wiki HERE
  • Dinosaurs.About.com HERE
  • EnchantedLearning HERE
  • Wiki HERE
  • FossilGuy HERE
  • BBC science site HERE
  • State Historical Site of North Dakota HERE
  • A not so educational video from the show Primeval HERE
  • A colouring page from Education.com HERE

Zhejiangopterus

Yes, more dinosaurs… or rather not dinosaurs… enjoy my continuing deflation of any sort of pride in how caught up my blog is! But once it is… bam I will be on top of the world!!!

 

Now there is a mouthful! Pronounced ZHE-zhang-OP-ter-us (does that even really help much either?), this is not a dinosaur but a pterosaur found in the late Cretaceous period. Found in the coastal area of Asia (specifically China), this flying lizard subsisted mainly on a diet of fish. It was toothless and had an usually long head and neck without any sort of crest. Moderately large in stature it had extra long legs as well.

This flying reptile was impressive in size and number of unearthed portions as well as pretty much full skeletons. Quite the interesting character!

We have a few links of interest to share with this one:

  • Dinosaurs.about.com HERE
  • Prehistoric-Wildlife.com HERE
  • My Dino’s (title straight from site) HERE
  • Dino Dominion HERE
  • DinosaurFact.net HERE
  • Open Caching Beta HERE
  • Dinosaur Train Field Guide, just put the rather difficult to spell name into the search engine HERE
  • Dinosaur Train Wiki HERE
  • Wikipedia HERE
  • Our Google search for the images HERE
  • Our pictures is from deviantArt HERE thanks to Xezansaur called Zhejiangopterus Linhaiensis

Pachyrhinosaurus

A taste of my own… if you start it finish it philosophy. Waaaaay delayed!!! Well, it keeps you humble. Enjoy!

Edit: For a video that is current check out this video to hear how this dinosaur got its name. Thanks to the Royal Tyrrell Museum.

I must admit our 2013-2014 school year has been light on the dinosaurs. It just seems like learning to read and external forces have held us at bay… but no longer! We are planning to go up to AT LEAST 2 a week if not back to our original 5. This means LOTS of hunting for mommy for those more obscure dinosaurs. But first… the Pachyrhinosaurus.

This Cretaceous period herbivore was found in what is now Alberta and Alaska. Believed to have moved in herds, it was a rather unintelligent dinosaur with less hearing and scent capabilities. Being a plant eater its teeth were constantly worn down and replaced and included cheek teeth. Without brow or nasal bones this 4 legged dinosaur had a rather unique look. Definitely a traditional plant eater though!

Our video today was from the documentary March of the Dinosaurs. (part 5) All thanks to Clubpenguindino.

And now for our links. Sadly we are finding less links now that we are going more obscure but they ARE helpful nonetheless.

  • Walking With Dinosaurs site (BBC) HERE
  • Dinosaurs.about.com HERE
  • Walking With Wikis HERE
  • Animal Planet HERE
  • Wiki HERE
  • And our colouring page found on Caw. HERE