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Enantiornithine… Not a Dinosaur!

Back to rather old saved posts before I face the October resize. Enjoy this NOt dinosaur!

But a bird found during the age of dinosaurs. The enantiornithine died out at the end of the Cretaceous period but was common during the Mesozoic era. With feathers and teeth, this omnivore has been found as small as a sparrow and as big as a turkey. Toted as the possible origin of feathers and birds… this prehistoric bird has been a creature of interest for some time. They are thought to be found everywhere but Antarctica, virtually all over the Pangea.

We came across the enantiornithine on Dinosaur Train so of course we had to hunt more. This bird was a wonderful creature to restart our dinosaur odyssey. We had one good video that both Emanuel and Gavin enjoyed. PL3_Bird_Enantiornithine Birds by Walter Jahn.

Our second video was more a peek at a rendering on the Dinopedia for Walking With Dinosaurs. An image from their opening HERE. Of course this bird is also featured on Dinosaur Train. You can watch them on PBSkids.org. Or Netflix of course. We found our best images on Google WERE Dinosaur Train. I simply did a Google search for enantiornithine  or enantiornithine  dinosaur train and clicked images.

We had a few links. Some were too advanced for my current learners but I have included them here all the same out of interest sake.

  • Random Thoughts has a… random thought about our bird HERE.
  • Dinosaur Train’s Field Guide… click search and find our bird HERE.
  • Dinosaur Train Wikia HERE.
  • Answers in Genesis has an article HERE.
  • Phys.Org HERE.
  • Wiki article HERE.
  • A Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology HERE
  • Our colouring page came from deviantArt. We used it to trace out our dinosaur and paste it on a scene the boys drew… Thanks to Albertonykus HERE.

Minmi

Another delayed post… but interesting all the same. I hope they are helpful to someone and of nothing else, a wonderful record of times when the kids and I had fun learning about something new and just a bit unique.

 

While 2014 has not had us digging deep into the dinosaur world like we have, we did find the time to learn all about this Australian herbivore. The Minmi is named after a water body in Australia and is one of the most complete sets of fossils. Things like stomach content, skin texture and all sorts of fine details are saved in the fossils. It is believed that this dinosaur was often washed to sea and preserved as it was definitely a 4 legged land mammal.

Emanuel found this dinosaur most interesting due to its many armored plates and its obvious herbivore nature. We had a great discussion about where Australia is and how this was NOT a large armored dinosaur. Now we did have a rather interesting video by La Trobe University. Australian Dinosaur – Minmi.

And the links were actually plentiful on this dinosaur:

  • EnchantedLearning HERE
  • Australian Museum HERE
  • Age of Dinosaurs HERE
  • Find the Best has a great picture HERE
  • Dinosaur of the Week HERE
  • KidsDinos.com HERE
  • The National Dinosaur Museum has a lengthy article HERE
  • Wiki has their article HERE
  • We got our picture off of deviantArt by hyphenatedsuperhero HERE
  • We FOUND this dinosaur in a library book – The Big Book of Dinosaurs by DK.

Pachyrhinosaurus

A taste of my own… if you start it finish it philosophy. Waaaaay delayed!!! Well, it keeps you humble. Enjoy!

Edit: For a video that is current check out this video to hear how this dinosaur got its name. Thanks to the Royal Tyrrell Museum.

I must admit our 2013-2014 school year has been light on the dinosaurs. It just seems like learning to read and external forces have held us at bay… but no longer! We are planning to go up to AT LEAST 2 a week if not back to our original 5. This means LOTS of hunting for mommy for those more obscure dinosaurs. But first… the Pachyrhinosaurus.

This Cretaceous period herbivore was found in what is now Alberta and Alaska. Believed to have moved in herds, it was a rather unintelligent dinosaur with less hearing and scent capabilities. Being a plant eater its teeth were constantly worn down and replaced and included cheek teeth. Without brow or nasal bones this 4 legged dinosaur had a rather unique look. Definitely a traditional plant eater though!

Our video today was from the documentary March of the Dinosaurs. (part 5) All thanks to Clubpenguindino.

And now for our links. Sadly we are finding less links now that we are going more obscure but they ARE helpful nonetheless.

  • Walking With Dinosaurs site (BBC) HERE
  • Dinosaurs.about.com HERE
  • Walking With Wikis HERE
  • Animal Planet HERE
  • Wiki HERE
  • And our colouring page found on Caw. HERE